Migratory Patterns
#039: From Feeling Out Of Place At Home to Stardom Abroad | Brian O’shea

#039: From Feeling Out Of Place At Home to Stardom Abroad | Brian O’shea

June 18, 2019

While growing up in his native Argentina, Brian O'shea never quite felt like he belonged, so it's no surprise that his idea of where "Home" is boils down the sum of an equation with ever-shifting values that works out to something like Home = Where You Are + Where Your family Is + Where the People You Care About Are. It's probably one of the most adaptable and relate-able definitions that I've come across so far- which makes sense, since Brian is one of the most adaptable and relate-able people that you can ever hope to meet. And it's those traits that have helped him achieve massive success as a vlogger in China, where he has tens of millions of fans who tune in to his videos. He's become what I like to call a "bridge person," someone is uniquely positioned to help connect people from different cultures, and he's created a space where Chinese people can learn about their own culture through his discovery of it.

Check out Brian's videos all over the interwebs!
 
 
Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!
#038: From Tourist to Line Cook to Restaurateur to TV Star: A Migrant’s Journey | Jun Trinh

#038: From Tourist to Line Cook to Restaurateur to TV Star: A Migrant’s Journey | Jun Trinh

June 11, 2019

Jun Trinh never thought he'd be in China. As a half-Chinese kid growing up in Toronto he refused offers to take trips there with his family. He never went to Mandarin class. But now, 11 years after a detour during an around-the-world trip all but marooned him in Beijing, he's thinking about his next steps and reflecting on the internal voyage of self-discovery that he's been on since he's been there. His time in China has not only changed him, but he's had the very rare opportunity to make a visible, tangible impact on the culture. He's opened a successful restaurant that has blazed a culinary trail in the city's ultra-competitive, world-class F&B scene, and his talents even landed him on TV, first as a contestant and a judge on popular cooking shows, and then as a host of his own travel / cooking show. So how does one follow up such n incredible decade-plus stint like that? Could the only logical next goal be to become a yacht captain in the Mediterranean? Just who is this guy, anyway? Does he even know?

 
Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!
#037: Always Moving Forward… Because There’s Nowhere To ‘Go Back’ To | Alex Sherr

#037: Always Moving Forward… Because There’s Nowhere To ‘Go Back’ To | Alex Sherr

June 4, 2019
Alex Sherr didn't choose the #ExpatLife. His parents brought him from his native New York to Hong Kong while he was in high school, but he's taken to life as a foreigner with gusto. After graduation, he spent a gap year in Beijing learning Chinese, and never left. A year of college prep was followed by enrollment in Peking University's prestigious International Relations program, where he founded the Western Student Union. But beneath the globe-trotting and academic success (he scored a B in Marxist Theory and English), is something that is unusual to most of us, but is becoming much more common: A different sense of where "Home" might be than what many would recognize. If you leave your country of origin at 14, camp out in another country with your parents until the end of high school, then move on to another country for college while your parents move to another place that you have no connection to, how can you ever feel at home? It''s something that might sound frightening to many- it feels like something vital would be lacking. And while that might be true from a certain perspective, there are benefits, such as an unlimited horizon of possibilities. If you're not attached to a particular place, then there's nothing to prevent you from going anywhere.
 
 
Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!
#036: Privilege In the Face Of Challenge | Gabriel Clermont, Part 2

#036: Privilege In the Face Of Challenge | Gabriel Clermont, Part 2

May 29, 2019

What it's like to want it all, to be able to live in 2 worlds at once? Like several other people who I've spoken with,, Gabe Clermont often feels like he's rooted in two worlds: His hometown of New York, and the place where he's been able to thrive professionally. In part 2 of our conversation, we touch on the challenges that feeling at home in multiple places can present. What does it mean to be a New Yorker at heart, but not feel like he has opportunity there? And why does he miss one city while he's in the other? Is he living an "overseas story," or a "migration story?" Is he living overseas because he's mission-driven, or has he been called to it? And at our core, what makes somebody want to make such a leap in the first place?

  • NOTE: Check out episode #19 to hear my interview with Tanya Crossman to learn more about the 50 million people who live overseas and intend to return to their places of origin.
 
Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!
#035: Challenges In the Face Of Privilege | Gabriel Clermont, Part 1

#035: Challenges In the Face Of Privilege | Gabriel Clermont, Part 1

May 21, 2019

Gabriel Clermont has a deep affinity for his hometown of New York, yet feels that it was kind of inevitable that he made the leap to living overseas, trading one global media hub for another. Each of his parents has an extraordinary #MigrationStory, and he "Didn't want to be the least adventurous person in [his] family." As familiar as living in a global hub is to him, when he arrived, he encountered a new kind of diversity, and, unlike New York, things weren't tailored specifically for your tribe or niche. You need to find a way to fit unto the systems and communities that are here- or you create one of your own. And while the very act of being able to move abroad shows how much agency one has, it doesn't mean that the path isn't riddled with obstacles, such as the Year 1, Year 3 & Year 5 hurdles that weed out many an adventurer. And how might these challenges differ for folks who go abroad at a different stage of life? Is it easier for kids to make the leap overseas straight out of college, or is it better to wait until you've had a chance to go through some of your formative young adult experiences within your home culture before doing so?

 

NOTE: To hear more about Eleanor Liu, Beijing's oldest expat, download episode #15!
 
Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!
#034: Migrating Before they Migrate: Serving Cross-Culture Students Overseas | Barbara Chen

#034: Migrating Before they Migrate: Serving Cross-Culture Students Overseas | Barbara Chen

May 14, 2019

Barbara Chen got her first taste of China in 1989 (what timing!), fell in love, got married, and after a stint back in the US, has called Beijing home for the last 18 years. During that time she's raised a bi-cultural family and now works as a recruiter for an American university, helping Chinese kids make the leap to the west for their education. But, as she taught me, Chinese students who want to go overseas actually have to enter a western-style education system long before they even take the SAT. This required exit from the domestic system has created a kind of parallel world where Chinese kids end up code switching between school and home, essentially migrating internally before they migrate to another country. She also taught me a new term: "Cross-culture kids"

Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!
#033: Coming of Age As A TCK… And Then What? | Mio Rudnicki

#033: Coming of Age As A TCK… And Then What? | Mio Rudnicki

May 7, 2019

Born in America, Mio Rudnicki grew up as a TCK, bouncing around the world as part of a multicultural family. In essence, she's been a migrant all of her life. So when she ended up in the US for high school and college, the experience that most of us take for granted was a huge culture shock for her. How do you navigate your daily life when you're surrounded by your fellow countrymen, but they're all completely and utterly foreign to you? It brings a whole new level of dread to that first day in the cafeteria when you're looking for a place to sit down for lunch. And after school is over, what then? How do you define yourself once the familiar social structures of educational institutions are gone? It's a problem that her engineering mind is just now starting to figure out.

NOTE: If you haven't yet, be sure to listen to Episode #19 to hear my interview with Tanya Crossman, as it makes an excellent companion to this discussion!
 
Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!
#032: What Migration Hath Wrought: Moroccan-Rum-Sports Bars In Hutongs | Badr Benjelloun

#032: What Migration Hath Wrought: Moroccan-Rum-Sports Bars In Hutongs | Badr Benjelloun

April 30, 2019
I've often described Badr Benjelloun as the quintessential example of a "Renaissance Expat," and this was never more obvious than when he opened Cu Ju, Beijing's first (and only) Moroccan/Rum/Sports Bar in one of the city's 1,000 year-old hutongs (alleyways). It was seen by many as a living example of the unique cultural mash-up that can only happen when you bring together disparate peoples into a city full of migrants. His #MigrationStory, which includes a stint as the "Blogger of Record" tracking Beijing's dynamic music scene in the 2000s and 2010s, illustrates how migration enlivens and enriches a place, and how people who come from abroad bring new ideas, perspectives and cultural ephemera to a city, making it a more vibrant, enjoyable place to live.
 
If you're in Beijing, check out Badr's restaurant-bar-livehouse, Caravan:
 
 
Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!
#031: When Does Migration Trump National Identity? | Margarita Lukavenko

#031: When Does Migration Trump National Identity? | Margarita Lukavenko

April 22, 2019
Born and raised on Russia's "Fish Tail" island of Sakhalin, Margarita Lukavenko got her first taste of foreign culture when she went to Malaysia as part of an exchange program at 16. Save for her final year of high school, she's been a migrant ever since- first as a student in far-off (and practically foreign) Moscow, and then as an educator and entrepreneur in China. As we discover in our conversation, this constant living outside of her place of origin has caused her to ask fundamental questions about her identity. It's something that happens to many of us, but we rarely talk about it in such an open manner. Leave it to a Russian to state bluntly what the rest of us only hint at.
 
  • Follow Margarita on Instagram to learn more about EduMatters & her work in the field of global education collaboration: @Margarita_GlobalLiving
 
Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts.... and subscribe!
#030: A Grown-up TCK Raising TCKs & Searching for Community | Dr. Kate Bailey Gardner

#030: A Grown-up TCK Raising TCKs & Searching for Community | Dr. Kate Bailey Gardner

April 15, 2019

When I met Dr. Kate Bailey Gardner in Boston in the mid-1990s she felt, as she says, "Like a bit of a social outcast." The term "TCK" was still new and she was coming to terms with her identity as a kid raised overseas who had moved back to her passport country for college. She's been on a journey to find herself and what "Home" means for her ever since. It's a #MigrationStory that's taken her from Hong Kong & Singapore to Boston, then to Beijing, then back to Boston, then to West Hartford, CT, then, with her children in tow, to Shanghai, and, finally, back to Hong Kong again. Has she finally found her place? Could her place be right back where she started?

 

Listen to episode #021 to hear my interview with Kate's husband, Josh Gardner, and to get the flip-side of this family's migration story. Kate & Josh are an amazing couple and their parallel journeys of self-discovery, both at "home" and abroad, are a microcosm of what millions of other families are going through all around the world.

 

Get in touch with comments, suggestions or interview recommendations:
 
 
Check out all of the shows in the Migration Media network on the web: www.migrationmedia.net
 
Please take a moment to "Like" us and leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Podbean or wherever you get your podcasts... and subscribe!